Queen’s chemist was a ‘joyful warrior’

CIC MEMBERS

In the early 1980s, China sent a select group of 100 graduate students to study abroad – the first to leave the country since the Cultural Revolution. Ninety-seven young men and three young women, including the late Suning Wang, FCIC, made that ground-breaking journey. A whip-smart,...

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Catalysis Division R. B. Anderson Award

CATALYSIS DIVISION
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It’s time to submit your nominations for the 2022 Catalysis Division R. B. Anderson Award. The Catalysis Division of the Chemical Institute of Canada administrates the R. B. Anderson Award every other year and it is sponsored by the Canadian Catalysis Foundation. The R. B. Anderson Award, named after the prominent Canadian catalysis researcher, is...

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From COVID-19 to climate change

SCIENCE POLICY

The CIC recently sent Queen’s University PhD chemistry student Bailey Smith to the virtual 2020 Canadian Science Policy Conference. Smith sampled panels on topics ranging from a green recovery to parallels between COVID-19 and climate change. Below, she offers her take on what she heard. By Bailey Smith One of the conference’s major themes was...

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Bringing students and companies together

LOCAL SECTIONS

On November 26th, 2020, the CIC Montreal Chapter hosted their first Online Job Fair. The event brought together close to a hundred people, including young graduates and industry representatives, all in the field of organic chemistry. The event featured two speakers from local pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations who presented the state of the...

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Political Polarization

SCIENCE POLICY

What Does it Mean for Science Communication and Decision-Making? The CIC recently sent Trent University M.Sc. graduate student Josephine C. Esposto to the virtual 2020 Canadian Science Policy Conference. Esposto sat in on ‘Polarization: What Does it Mean for Science Communication and Decision-Making?’ and offers her take on what she heard. Canadians have been facing the...

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Scientists as activists

SCIENCE POLICY

Is the role of scientists in public policy changing? And should it? The CIC recently sent Wilfrid Laurier University biological and chemical sciences PhD student Carolyn Brown to the virtual 2020 Canadian Science Policy Conference. Brown returned with some thoughts about the role of scientists in public policy. For many decades, scientists in developed countries...

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End-of-Year message from the Can. J. Chem. Eng. Editorial Team

CAN. J. CHEM. ENG.
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Thank you to our authors, reviewers, and readers for your support throughout 2020! Can you believe it is nearly the end of the year? The editorial team at The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering cannot either! We would like to express our sincere gratitude for the support of our authors, reviewers, and readers throughout 2020;...

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CCEC EDI programming catalyzes conversations, but will it catalyze change? That’s up to all of us.

EDI
BY:

The Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference (CCEC) 2020’s special equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) programming brought EDI to the forefront of the conversations happening in the Canadian chemical engineering community. This special program was presented at CCEC in collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). With a plenary panel, symposia presentations, and an interactive...

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Chicken, chocolate and celiac disease

RESEARCH & INNOVATION

What do poultry, chocolate, bananas and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower have in common? They all contain an essential amino acid called tryptophan, which launches a biochemical chain reaction in the body that controls intestinal inflammation and keeps the gut barrier healthy. In people with celiac disease though, that reaction is impaired,...

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Pandemic teaching – take two

EDUCATION

With Canada in the midst of a second wave of COVID-19, faculty are breathing a sigh of relief that at least they won’t be asked to navigate a second sudden shift to online instruction. That experience back in March 2020 was dubbed ‘pandemic pedagogy,’  ‘emergency remote teaching,’ or ‘hell’ depending on who you talked to....

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Tracking COVID-19 with wastewater

HEALTH & SAFETY

How the virus’s chemical signature gives advance warning of the rise and fall of community transmission. As the pandemic’s second wave tightens its grip across the country, researchers, municipalities, and public health agencies are experimenting with a COVID-19 early warning system that tests wastewater for the virus’s unique chemical signature. Swab tests for the coronavirus are expensive and we aren’t capturing enough data for a true picture of how many people are infected, say epidemiologists.

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