The push to disinfect and reuse disposable PPE

CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH

The toll of pandemic-related plastic waste from discarded PPE is mounting at an alarming rate. Health Canada estimates that between June 2020 and June 2021, 63,000 tons of COVID-19 related PPE will end up as landfill waste. Researchers are investigating possibilities for disinfecting and reusing single-use PPE, including medical gloves and hospital gowns.

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CCCE | IUPAC organizing committee call for nominations

COMMUNITY NEWS
BY:

The Canadian Society for Chemistry (CSC) is looking for a core leadership team to spearhead the potential organization of the upcoming CCCE/IUPAC conference in 2027. As a consequence of converting the 2021 CCCE/IUPAC conference to an online event due to COVID, IUPAC has afforded the CSC with an opportunity to bid for an in-person conference...

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Q & A on teaching with Alison Flynn, MCIC

EDUCATION

Alison Flynn, MCIC is an associate professor in the department of chemistry and biomolecular sciences at the University of Ottawa. She leads the Flynn Research Group, focused on learning at the postsecondary level, in chemistry and across disciplines. Flynn is the 2021 winner of CIC’s Award for Chemistry Education. CIC News recently asked Flynn to...

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New anti-psychotic nasal spray could ease side effects

CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH

Sneaking medications past our bodies’ blood-brain barrier has always been tricky. McMaster University chemical engineer Todd Hoare recently teamed up with a group of neuroscientist colleagues to make an antipsychotic nasal spray that does just that. The spray could reduce the drug’s often nasty side effects, including weight gain, diabetes, movement disorders and organ damage.

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“My STEM Stories” – More than a science communication webinar

EQUITY, DIVERSITY, AND INCLUSION
BY:

Through the “My STEM Stories” webinar, CWIC created a platform for persons from marginalized groups to share their story about working in STEM. CWIC provided science communication training in order to teach participants how to create a video telling their personal STEM story, and will share the content on a YouTube channel with a target audience of people who are interested in pursuing STEM. It will be a place for students (high school, undergraduate, etc.) to connect with Canadian graduate students through their video story, so that they would understand what a role in STEM is like, and see diverse people filling these positions.

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Q&A on teaching with Leah Martin-Visscher, MCIC

CELEBRATE

Leah Martin-Visscher is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at The King’s University, Edmonton and the 2021 winner of the Margaret-Ann Armour Award for Early Career Chemistry Education. Her research with undergraduates explores the use of bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides for food preservation. CIC News recently asked Martin-Visscher to share some insights from the classroom.

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Connecting the dots between sex, gender, and chemicals

CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH

Environmental contaminants can have different effects on women and men. The International Pollutants Elimination Network recently connected the dots between sex, gender, and chemicals with its report about the distinct effects of chemicals on women. It found women are disproportionally impacted by exposure to chemicals and have less access to participation in decision making.

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CSPC 2020: The social contract

COMMUNITY

In 2020 David Schlachter, a chemical engineering graduate student at Polytechnique Montréal, attended the  Canadian Science Policy Conference on behalf of the CIC. At the conference David attended a panel discussion on the social contract between science and the public, and he has shared the highlights of this panel discussion.

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New life-saving medical isotopes

CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH

In 1971, U.S. researchers published a proof-of-concept showing how a cyclotron could produce the world’s most commonly used medical isotope. For the next four decades, the paper sat on a shelf. In 2009, University of British Columbia radiologist Dr. François Bénard dusted it off and thought, ‘Why not try to develop that technology?’

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Raising a stink

CHEMISTRY FOR ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

When something fails to pass the ‘sniff test’ – whether it’s a plan of action or the milk in the back of the fridge – it’s often best to leave it be. But when it comes to unpleasant odours in the air, we don’t have much choice. We have to breathe.

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