Methane leaks from abandoned oil and gas wells underestimated

CHEMISTRY FOR ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

When Mary Kang landed an environmental policy fellowship at Princeton University in 2012, she decided to model methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells. It didn’t take long to discover a major roadblock. “I couldn’t find any data. And you need data for modelling,” recalls Kang, now a civil engineering professor at McGill University.

Read More >>

Clean energy hub makes its debut

LEARN

Catalyst (noun): an agent that provokes or speeds significant change or action. ‘Catalyst for change’ is such a well-worn phrase that it has lost much of its descriptive power. But in the case of a new materials research centre in Mississauga, it is apt on so many levels that it’s hard to avoid.

Read More >>

Raising a stink

CHEMISTRY FOR ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

When something fails to pass the ‘sniff test’ – whether it’s a plan of action or the milk in the back of the fridge – it’s often best to leave it be. But when it comes to unpleasant odours in the air, we don’t have much choice. We have to breathe.

Read More >>

A carbon free fuel: Hydrogen can

CHEMISTRY FOR ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
BY:

The Embassy of Canada in Berlin and the National Research Council of Canada, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, will be hosting a free virtual event, “A Carbon Free Fuel: Hydrogen Can,” at Falling Walls/Berlin Science Week on November 6th, 2020. Hydrogen is a versatile carbon-free chemical fuel that could serve as an energy vector...

Read More >>

Seeing the green light at the end of the tunnel

A third year lab course on organic synthesis techniques should have been just one more milestone for University of Toronto chemistry students John Russell and Leanna Smid. Instead, it spawned an entrepreneurial adventure that could alter the environmental footprint of teaching laboratories everywhere. “We both noticed that the issue of solvent waste was ever prevalent...

Read More >>