‘Rusty’ catalysts advance renewable energy storage

ENERGY
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University of Calgary researchers have developed a new family of amorphous catalysts based on iron oxide — rust — that turns water into hydrogen fuel. The innovation could improve systems for storing energy from intermittent, renewable sources like solar and wind. Currently, expensive materials like iridium or ruthenium oxide are used to overcome the activation...

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Student merit award winners

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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This year’s Canadian Society for Chemistry Merit Award winners are: 1st place, the University of Toronto at Mississauga and honourable mention...

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New extraction technique for functional foods

TECHNIQUES
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A team of engineers at Université Laval has developed a new system for efficiently extracting high-value bioactive molecules — potential nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals — from plant and animal proteins. In our gut, enzymes break up plant and animal proteins into hundreds of smaller peptides. Some of these reportedly have health benefits such as antioxidant or...

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The ‘ole cola trick draws a crowd

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Charles Lucy, a professor in the chemistry department at the University of Alberta, prepares to do a Diet-Coke-and- Mentos demonstration as part of an evening event organized by the Edmonton Local Section in March. Lucy’s presentation, called “Colour, Catalysts and Coca Cola” focused on the use of “student world examples” in teaching and public outreach...

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Then and now

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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From the beginning, the history of the companies that would become Canadian Industries Limited (C-I-L) have been entangled with that of the nation itself. The Hamilton Powder Company, founded in 1862, manufactured black powder — and later, dynamite — which was used in the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway. In 1885 the American A....

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A good mix for innovation

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Laurence Meadows of Mitacs, a not-for-profit organization that funds internships and fellowships to encourage innovation, presents at a Vancouver Local Section event in...

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Building public understanding with ‘molecular lego’

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Deoxyribonucleic acid, the blueprint of evolution, is arguably the world’s most famous molecule. But as McGill University’s Hanadi Sleiman explained to Toronto audiences last fall, the possible applications of DNA range far beyond merely encoding and decoding genetic information. Her public talk, entitled “Molecular Lego with DNA: Building Structures for Medicine and Materials Science,” was...

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