Science-based decision-making

Chemist partners with City of Kitchener on innovative air pollution study It’s not every day a chemist gets to directly affect government policy. So Wilfrid Laurier University chemistry Professor Hind Al-Abadleh, MCIC, is understandably excited about her school-based air pollution study in Kitchener. Al-Abadleh launched a pilot air-quality monitoring project earlier in 2020 in partnership with…

Medical masks that kill the COVID-19 virus

Researchers put anti-microbial mask coatings to the test. Triiodide, salt, and graphene-nano silver take their turn on the lab bench. Face masks with COVID-fighting coatings may be the next frontier in PPE. At least one such mask is available commercially in Canada – using a triiodide coating – and researchers are investigating the virus-busting powers…

Pioneering a pharmaceutical frontier

Cannabis has had a long history of being used as medicine before it was added to the Canada’s Act to Prohibit the Improper Use of Opium and other Drugs in 1923. After the federal government legalized recreational use of this drug in 2017, the country’s researchers have found themselves in the privileged position of being…

NSERC Alliance Grants for Covid research

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council is accelerating its processing of applications for support for research projects dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic. The agency is committing a total of $15 million to stimulate collaborations between academic researchers, the public and not-for-profit sectors, and industry to address pandemic-related research and technical challenges. Support for up to…

CIC Career Talk

The Chemical Institute of Canada Toronto Section (CICTor) is launching a new initiative for career exploration and networking! The Career Exploration Series will feature informal talks presented by graduates in the chemical field who are currently working in non-traditional careers in a variety of fields. Join us for the Career Exploration Series talk on Clinical…

Sampling the Salt Lake smog

For all of the majestic, mountain-ringed landscape that Utah’s Great Salt Lake region embodies, local residents can encounter a threat to their health each winter as the atmosphere succumbs to a thick smog. To help local officials develop mitigation strategies, Dr. Alexander Moravek and his collaborators wanted to pin down the composition and source of…

Irradier pour la santé

Radioactivité. Le terme peut alarmer, évoquant tout de suite des catastrophes comme celle de Tchernobyl. Or, des substances radioactives, appelées isotopes médicaux, sont utilisées chaque jour dans les hôpitaux pour faire de la radio-imagerie. Selon l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique, « 80% des examens d’imagerie médicale diagnostique effectués dans le monde font appel au molybdène-99 (99Mo)…

Putting microbes to work for us

What do glaucoma, oil sands tailings ponds and solar cells have in common? They all appear in the resumé of Dr. Vikramaditya Yadav, MCIC, a chemical engineering professor whose pursuit of bio-inspired tools…

Vaincre la malaria une protéine à la fois

« On est les premiers au monde à voir à quoi ressemble la protéine sur l’échelle atomique ! », s’enthousiasme Charles Calmettes, professeur au Centre INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier. Il a contribué à une étude récente publiée dans la revue Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences qui révèle la structure de la protéine kinase G (PKG) et son fonctionnement….

Guts and glory

Emma Allen-Vercoe touts her motto as “My microbes told me to do it”. The phrase captures the essence of her work as a professor in the University of Guelph’s Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, where she has spent more than a decade exploring the daunting biochemical frontier that makes up the human gut. This all too familiar part of our anatomy — which most of us would prefer to think of as a simple black box that turns food into feces — harbours an anaerobic environment known as the microbiome.

Notorious killer yields a life-saving toxin

The death-cap looks much like any harmless variety of mushroom and is rumoured to have a pleasant flavour, but as its gruesome name suggests, tasting comes with serious consequences. Known formally as Amanita phalloides, this particular fungus can synthesize various families of toxins, like phallotoxins and amatoxins. One compound in particular gives the death-cap its…