The Big Chill

MATERIALS CHEMISTRY

Is hockey the greatest sport on earth? Few Canadians would disagree. In terms of speed and intensity, hockey is unmatched by any other game. It is also the consummate team sport. A win is impossible unless every player works together, each athlete giving — as the cliché goes — 110 percent.

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Queen’s University debuts First Annual Poster Day

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The fall semester started off with a bang at Queen’s University. In the midst of orientation week, the Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Association (CEGSA), in conjunction with the Queen’s Department of Chemical Engineering and the Canadian Society...

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Grapevine

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Dan Bizzotto of the University of British Columbia has been selected as the winner of the 2015 Prix Jacques Tacussel from the International Society for Electrochemistry, in recognition of his contribution to the development of in situ electrochemical fluorescence microscopy...

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CSChE and CGCEN announce the 2015 award winners

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering (CSChE) has announced its 2015 award winners. Official presentations took place at the 65th Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference in Calgary held this past October. Details about the winners’ research are available at...

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CIC heads west to boost chem student engagement

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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This past September marked a busy month for Chemical Institute of Canada (CIC) student activities. Following a poster competition and trivia night, career development leader Amy Reckling set off on a two-week tour in late September to meet with students enrolled...

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Get Smart

POLICY PUNDIT

David Strangway has been a prominent and influential voice in science policy Canada for more than four decades. A former president of three universities: Toronto, UBC and Quest in Squamish, BC, 81-year-old Strangway was also founding president of the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and played a major role in designing the Canada Research Chairs...

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Co-ops give engineering grads a career boost

EDUCATION

When chemical engineering students graduate, they face a career dilemma other recent grads would kill for. Should they go into oil refining or biotechnology? Pharmaceuticals, nuclear energy or the food industry? Process development or project management? Whether they’re investigating toxins in our oceans or researching polymers in space, for new chemical engineers looking for employment the sky is literally the limit.

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Reflections on 19 years of leadership at the CIAC

INDUSTRY

In 1996 I joined the Canadian Chemical Producers Association, now the Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC). That was the best career decision I ever made for me and for my family. During the past 19 years I have been fortunate to work with industry leaders who were dedicated to the development of a sustainable chemistry industry in Canada and to our global leadership in Responsible Care (RC).

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Mapping science’s post-election future in Canada

GOVERNMENT

Well, it’s finally over — for now. The 2015 federal election results are in with a new majority Liberal government. What does it all mean for the future of science in this country?  First, a word about what happened. Science received more than its usual due for an electoral campaign. Readers will have noticed an...

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Cutting-edge discoveries outstrip patent laws

INTELLECTUAL MATTERS

Next year marks an important anniversary in chemical history.  In 1916, Gilbert Lewis published his seminal paper on chemical bonding, “The Atom and the Molecule,” from which were born Lewis dot structures. The year 2016 then, marks the 100th anniversary of Lewis’s concept of the covalent bond model and electron pairs. Only 100 years ago,...

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1969 Chemistry in Canada

HISTORY
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The colour of our food is important not only from an aesthetic perspective but an evolutionary one. Psychologists have theorized that human adaptation and survival are due in part to being attracted to foods that appear “good” while rejecting foods that appear “bad.” Such connections develop in concert with the experiences associated with eating certain...

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Autism linked to molecules from the human gut

CHEMFUSION

We share our body with up to a thousand varieties of bacteria. They live in our mouth, our skin and mostly in our digestive tract. They total some 100 trillion — 10 times greater than the number of human cells in the body. We have known since the groundbreaking work of Louis Pasteur and Robert...

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Worth its salt?

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY

Last month, David Leblanc made a kind of pilgrimage to Oak Ridge, Tenn. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of a very special moment in nuclear history. From 1965 until 1969, the United States Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Laboratory was home to the world’s only functioning molten salt nuclear reactor (MSR). Based on an experimental...

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New Prescription

PHARMACEUTICALS

Strategically wedged between the many lanes of the Trans-Canada Highway and Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport at the west end of the island of Montreal, the Saint-Laurent Campus of Technoparc Montréal is this city’s bid to establish a world-beating concentration of research-intensive industries. The land was set aside for this purpose in the late 1980s...

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