CSChE and CGCEN 2014 award winners announced

RECOGNITION
BY:

The Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering (CSChE) and Canadian Green Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Network (CGCEN) have announced the award winners for 2014. Official presentations took place this past October at the 64th Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference...

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Grapevine

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Robin Rogers of McGill University has been appointed to the latest Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Green Chemistry and Green Chemicals. Rogers comes to Canada from The University of Alabama, where he was the Robert Ramsay Chair of Chemistry and Director of the Center for Green Manufacturing. McGill U will receive up to $10...

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Alberta oil sands column rankles ACCN reader

LETTER

I noted with astonishment the column “Oil sands phase-out may be Canada’s greatest contribution to the world” in the Sept-Oct, 2014 issue of the Canadian Chemical News (ACCN). Frankly, I am equally surprised by the call for a “phase-out” of the Canadian oil sands. Who are the scientists you claim to have concluded that “fossil fuels must remain in, or return to, the ground if we are to address global warming…?”

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Student symposium supports self-assembly community

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The annual Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures (CSACS) Student Symposium took place this past September at the Université de Montréal. The event, which marked its 10th anniversary, brought together more than 100 faculty, students and post docs from CSACS-member...

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Ordering of magnetic properties run hot and cold

MATERIALS SCIENCE

Given how much information we regularly store in magnetic form on everything from computer hard disks to credit card strips, researchers are increasingly interested in the stability of magnetic properties in materials. Mary Anne White, a chemist at Dalhousie University...

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Marine natural products research threatened

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

The need for new biologically active compounds with applications as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and cosmeceuticals is undeniable. In the very near future, there is a serious risk that a significant number of infections, particularly hospital-acquired infections, will be untreatable. There are no effective drugs for many forms of cancer. The obesity epidemic has created a need...

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Most innovations are potentially patentable

INTELLECTUAL MATTERS

In my prior column, I wrote how some businesses in Canada are failing to protect and extract value from the intellectual property they are generating. In fact, it’s possible that many organizations in Canada are simply not aware that they are generating intellectual property. So how can an organization improve and profit from innovation in...

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Then and Now

HISTORY
BY:

Few modern companies have roots reaching back to the Renaissance. Merck, the oldest pharmaceutical company in the world, is one of them. The company was created in 1668 by German apothecary Friedrich Jacob Merck, who bought Angel Pharmacy, or Engel Apotheke, to hawk his herbs, lozenges and electuaries. The business was located in Darmstadt, known...

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Innovative technology could spell the end of toxic red mud

TECHNIQUES

A Quebec firm has solved a critical challenge for the aluminium industry, earning the 2014 Canadian Green Chemistry and Engineering Award (CSA Group Award for Organizations) from the Chemical Institute of Canada. Orbite Aluminae’s high purity alumina production facility in Cap-Chat, Que. has been recognized with a green chemistry award. Photo credit: Orbite Aluminae Inc. Orbite...

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Polymeric links in ancient resin perplex researchers

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Amber, a relatively simple resin secreted by trees, is among nature’s sturdiest and perhaps most elegant compounds. It is tough enough to withstand millions of years’ worth of environmental abuse, yet it remains capable of capturing light in a gem-like fashion suitable for jewelry.

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Can an apple a day keep the bad science away?

CHEMFUSION

Did Eve eat an apple to have a better sex life with Adam? One might come to that conclusion after reading a paper published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics with the alluring title, “Apple consumption is related to better sexual quality of life in young women.” Indeed one might come to that conclusion...

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Tracking the chemical fracking controversy

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

The line of wheat waving in a field in the Alberta countryside is broken abruptly by a dark earthen wall. Packed in behind this berm are more than a dozen tractor-trailer big rigs, including 10 powerful pumper trucks running full bore, generating more than 22,000 horsepower.  As we drive up to the worksite, located near...

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Photonic chips the last frontier for fibre optics

PHOTONIC CHEMISTRY

As the hardware in communications systems has progressed from copper wires to fibre optic cables, the acceleration of data transfer speed has been profound. No one with access to fibre would ever want to go back to copper connections, but there is still one place we are stuck with them...

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Finding laboratory chemicals through the classified ads

EDUCATION

In laboratories around the world, researchers regularly pay top dollar for specialized materials to conduct their work. Afterward, any leftovers usually go into storage, where all too often they remain unused and forgotten. In cases where chemical agents eventually become toxic or volatile, such obscurity can pose physical hazards. But Anna Klinkova sees a more...

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Something fishy with nanotechnology?

NANOTECHNOLOGY

Nanotech: Think big by thinking small. That could be nanotechnology’s tagline, if indeed this hot area of science needed a cool slogan — which it doesn’t. That’s because nanotech is already the wunderkind of science and the darling of the industrial world. Embraced by the public and researchers alike, nanotechnology is being touted as the...

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