Energy tops agenda at CSChE Conference

CONFERENCES
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More than 900 researchers, academics, students and governement and industry representatives descended upon New Brunswick last October for the 63rd Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference, held in picturesque Fredericton. The conference theme, “Resources, Environment, Energy,” addressed the critical issues facing chemical engineers today in Canada and around the world. Symposia included the latest advances in forest biorefinery, nanotechnology, ...

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Centennial celebration at U of S

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The University of Saskatchewan Department of Chemistry celebrated 100 years of graduates during last October’s National Chemistry Week in Saskatoon. The event included a tribute to alumnus Henry Taube’s 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, followed by a reception and poster session. Speakers at the centennial celebration included (L-R): Holly Severin, NOVA Chemicals; Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, FCIC,...

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Access to science journals reinstated

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) and the American Chemical Society (ACS) have entered into an agreement that will provide access to chemistry journals at Canadian universities without a download-based model In 2012, the ACS proposed changing its pricing model to one that is based upon the number of downloads at each institution. This potentially...

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Solar guru shines message on Chemistry Week in Edmonton

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Harry Gray, Arnold O. Beckman professor of chemistry and founding director of the Beckman Institute at the California Institute of Technology spoke to hundreds of university and high school students as well as the general public last October as part of National Chemistry Week. Gray’s lecture, “Powering the Planet: Solar Fuels,” presented solutions to the...

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National Chemistry Week slimes Ottawa

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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The Chemical Institute of Canada Ottawa Section celebrated last October’s National Chemistry Week by making slime for attendees to the Canada Science and Technology Museum. More than 100 parents and kids received a hands-on chemistry lesson by Bell High School student volunteers who demonstrated slime-making techniques. The event, funded in part by the CIC Chemical...

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Grapevine

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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Gregory Jerkiewicz, professor of chemistry at Queen’s University and Editor-in-Chief of Electrocatalysis, has been appointed to the Advisory Board of FC Cubic, the Fuel Cell Cutting-Edge Research Center Technology Research Association. FC Cubic is supported

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New quantum laboratory opens at University of Waterloo

MATERIALS SCIENCE

The advent of electronic systems that can operate at the level of quantum interactions promises to usher in an era of unprecedented computer processing speed and information storage. Before this revolution can begin, however, scientists need to make the raw materials that will go into this new equipment. This past December, the University of Waterloo opened up a laboratory to do just that.

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Imaging boost for fuel cells

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY

The same tomographic imaging technique that provides doctors and surgeons with vital views inside their patients is now being adapted to improve the performance of hydrogen fuel cells. Researchers at Simon Fraser University are working with Burnaby-based Ballard Power Systems to apply a new tool for testing and characterizing these devices.

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Size counts when it comes to contrast agents

NANOTECHNOLOGY

Radiographic images produced by X-rays have been a staple tool of medical diagnosis for many decades and this technology remains one of the health care system’s workhorses. Nevertheless, important physiological features, such as the emergence or growth of tumours, ...

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Making the most of minerals

MINERAL PROCESSING

This past fall, the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) opened the Mineral Processing Pilot Plant to enhance the Canadian mining industry’s capabilities in Western Canada and beyond.

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Chemical warfare used to battle invasive species

CHEMFUSION

Dead mice don’t get headaches. So why are scientists on the island of Guam stuffing them with acetaminophen, the widely used painkiller? The hope is that the acetaminophen will give a major headache to brown tree snakes. More than a headache in fact. Should the snakes dine on the toxin-filled rodents, it will be their...

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NMR for the masses

RESEARCH

Take two aspirin and call me in the morning,” is the advice meted out late at night to an achy patient by the country doctor of fable. While it’s true that Aspirin has been the go-to remedy for much of humanity’s twinges and pangs, recent research indicates that the humble white pill may turn out...

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Persistent Contamination

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Survival in the Arctic has always been about finding food in a harsh land, as many European­ explorers learned the hard way. Some, such as Roald Amundsen of Norway, made good use of the nutritional wisdom of the Arctic Inuit, whom he met during his exploration of the Northwest Passage from 1903 to 1906. This...

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Analyzing oligosaccharides to detect adulterated juice

FOOD CHEMISTRY

In the mid-1980s, a Florida citrus growers’ organization offered $50,000 to anyone who could develop an analytical technique for detecting orange juice adulterated with cheap beet juice. Graduate student Nicholas Low, who was working on enzymes responsible for carbohydrate hydrolysis, thought he had a solution.

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Then and Now

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS
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With the longest coastline in the world, and an export economy founded upon natural resources, shipbuilding and ship repair is arguably Canada’s most iconic industry. Rubber has been a key part of Canadian shipping since the 19th century, becoming ubiquitous in shipbuilding and shipyards, where it was used for everything from hoses to protective coatings...

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