News

January 2018
CLEAN THECHNOLOGY

Bioindustrial Innovation Canada (BIC) is making a strategic investment in FireRein Inc., a small firm that has been introducing Canada’s fire-fighting community to Eco-Gel, a new, environmentally benign fire-suppression...

January 2018
RADIOISOTOPES

In the seven years since a tsunami demolished three Fukushima Daiichi reactors in Japan, the radioactive isotopes that spread from this event to Canada’s west coast have dwindled to levels that can only...

Fall 2017
ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Our planet’s lower atmosphere is one very busy place, chemically speaking, as climate researchers have discovered. They are developing a new appreciation of complex processes such as cloud formation and radiative forcing, which determines how much light from the sun can reach the earth’s surface and how much heat can escape.

Fall 2017
POLYMERS

Rubber polymers have been capturing the attention of chemists and the wider public since at least 1770, when pioneering chemist Joseph Priestley coined the term for a material that could remove lead pencil marks from paper.

Fall 2017
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Which is cleaner, diesel or gasoline? It’s a complex question. While diesel emits more greenhouse gases per gallon, it is also more energy dense and can result in greater fuel economy, lowering emissions...

Fall 2017
NATURAL PRODUCTS CHEMISTRY

Naturally occurring complex molecules make attractive research targets, especially if they have some compelling property like antibiotic behaviour. University of British Columbia chemistry professor Katherine Ryan...

Summer 2017
BIOCHEMISTRY

Computer models based on molecular energy budgets have made it easier than ever to imagine the myriad ways a protein structure could be folded. Yet it has still been difficult to determine which of those patterns are stable enough to exist in nature, so that their properties could be studied formally.

Summer 2017
PHARMACEUTICALS

Apoisonous plant’s value is in the eye of the beholder and Thapsia garganica has become highly prized by cancer specialists. In the wake of a recently published development by investigators at Queen’s University, many cancer patients could become downright fond of these noxious yellow Mediterranean perennials.